NHS: What’s wrong and how to put it right (or replace it with something better)

Dr Vernon Coleman





It is easy to show that health care in Britain is worse today than it was 50 years ago. And arguably it is worse than it was 70 years ago. Indeed, it is worse than would be acceptable in many backward, third-world countries.

Health care in Britain has been doing more harm than good for many years because the NHS, which provides most of the health care in the UK, is dangerous, absurdly bureaucratic and wildly expensive. It has been dying for a long time.

I doubt if I was the only person to be shocked when the queen of England gave the George Cross medal to the NHS. The medal was apparently awarded to celebrate the way the NHS dealt with patients in 2020 and 2021. Those were the years when hospital departments were closed, for no good reason, when staff panicked and behaved hysterically in the face of an infection proven to be no more dangerous than the annual flu, when essential treatments were abandoned and waiting lists allowed to grow to inhuman proportions – with the result that millions of patients will die because they have not been investigated or treated. They were years when doctors and nurses wore masks which do more harm than good, and forced patients to wear them too. They were years when doctors and nurses ill-treated patients and were responsible for murdering tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of elderly patients simply because they were old and ill. They were years when doctors and nurses promoted, gave and lied about experimental, toxic jabs which never did what they were supposed to do but which were known to be among the most dangerous drugs ever manufactured. Worse still, doctors and nurses ignored the legal and ethical requirement to tell patients about all potential side effects before involving them in an experiment. They were years when doctors and nurses helped smear the honest practitioners who were trying to share the truth. They were the years when doctors and nurses mis-treated patients and betrayed every tenet of the Hippocratic Oath.

And it was because of all those sins that the queen gave the NHS staff the George Cross.

Of course, the queen never had to use the NHS. The British taxpayers paid for her and her grasping, hypocritical, entitlement obsessed family to have the very best private care. It isn’t because they live healthy lives or come from good genetic stock that most of them live such long lives. Their longevity is down to the fact that they receive private medical care and are not exposed to the inadequacies of the National Health Service.

You don’t have to look far to find horror stories of maltreatment, neglect and incompetence. As I write, in August 2022, there are around seven million people waiting for urgent medical treatment and the figure is expected to double in the next twelve months. Millions more are waiting for essential tests to see if they have cancer or heart disease. And once the tests are done they will have to wait weeks or months for the results. There is effectively no GP service today. The average GP works just 26 hours a week and earns well over £100,000 (plus bonuses of between £50,000 and £100,000 for having their NHS nurse give covid jabs on their behalf). Many GPs refuse to see patients in the consulting room – and agree to telephone or video consultations only after patients have been interrogated by untrained reception staff. The vast majority of GPs refuse to visit patients at home (because the medical establishment decrees it a waste of their valuable time) and are not available even for telephone consultations outside their 26 hour working week. GPs are no longer available for evening or weekend calls and their surgeries are firmly shut at lunchtimes and on bank holidays. The result of the collapse of the GP service is that accident and emergency departments are clogged with patients usually having to wait eight or nine hours, and sometimes twice as long, to be seen in many hospitals. The queues for treatment are so long that ambulances (which now often take hours to respond to urgent, emergency calls for help) have to queue outside for up to 27 hours.

None of this has happened by accident.

The NHS was murdered and is clearly no longer fit for purpose; it is, on the face of it, an example to the world of the pointlessness and intrinsic design weakness of socialised medicine.

The NHS is now just a killing machine – it appears to be deliberately managed and run to reduce the size of the population as fast as possible.

The above article is taken from Vernon Coleman’s new monograph called `NHS: What’s wrong and how to put it right’ – a searingly accurate analysis of the NHS in which he explains precisely what is now wrong with the NHS and precisely how it could be repaired.

He has also offered an astonishingly simple way to replace the NHS with a much better alternative – totally affordable and far less bureaucratic, unfriendly and corrupt. It will, I think, stagger you with its efficiency and simplicity.

The monograph will only take you an hour to read but Vernon says it took him 56 years to research and write.

The monograph, already hated by terrified NHS administrative staff, is available as a paperback and it’s called `NHS: What’s wrong and how to put it right’. It costs £2.99.

Incidentally, it seems that some NHS staff members don’t understand how the system is failing and how patients feel let down. One critic has claimed that GPs do provide a 24 hour service though I suspect that patients might be surprised to hear this since in practice the out of hours service provided is cosmetic and so feeble that it is of no practical value. The same inevitably anonymous critic appears to misunderstood and underestimate the ease with which the over-bureaucratic appointment system can be easily and profitably abolished for GPs and patients.

The problem is that the NHS is an essentially corrupt organisation, currently run for the benefit of employees rather than patients. The organisation needs a re-assessment and, if necessary, it needs replacing with something much better. Please read `NHS: What’s wrong and how to put it right’ and write a review detailing your views about the NHS.

Incidentally, I see that GPs have been told they can close their practices on the day of the Queen’s funeral. The big question: how the hell will anyone know they’re shut?

Copyright Vernon Coleman September 2022





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